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⚔ Flipsky 6374 vs Maytech 6374 vs Ali C6374 (Dickyho motors)

So I decided to open all these motors up and try to compare them. I don’t know too much about magnet physics, so I won’t comment explicitly on the curvature or lack thereof of the magnets on these motors, but the other stuff I have more experience with.

All 3 of the motors are the most up-to-date versions. They all claim to be 170kv


New Flipsky 6374


The newer flipsky 6374 are the first motor actually designed and made by flipsky themselves. After doing a GB on them, I am probably the first person to get the 170kv version and try them out

General characteristics
The motor seems to be very quiet and has a smooth start in HFI with less cogging than other motors. It doesn’t have a huge kick like maytechs, perhaps more comparable to SK3s.

Can Weight: 370g
Stator weight: 573g
Approx Assembled weight: 950g
Stator length (Edge to edge, not including tallest winding): 45mm
Stator Diameter: 53mm

Internals
Magnet retention


No dual retention rings like other motors, but a large amount of epoxy.

Hall Sensor PCB


The sensors are embedded in the stator, and they actually have epoxy supporting the PCB and wires, something missing on other motors. There isn’t insulation on the top of the 3 pin sensors though which is a shame as there is on the 5 pin connection.

Shaft design
Retained with 2 grub screws under a large amount of epoxy/loctite. Perhaps impractical if you want to replace the shaft, but the shaft is machined with holes for the grub screws so they’re not just pressed onto the shaft like the older jointechs. Stepped design is a good thing for compatibility and strength, currently not available on other motors without requesting modifications. Please note this will mean some of the extra can weight is in the shaft for the flipsky motors, but irregardless its still a higher thermal mass for an 8mm shaft motor.

Can design
The can sits flush with the stator and has no air-gaps at the back, creating a more sealed design. Its also longer than the maytech can, but it does have a total length of 74mm.

Stator
Yes, the stator is actually larger than a maytech stator. Its heavier too, even though the wires are slightly thinner and the shaft hole is larger.


Maytech MTO6374-HA-C


Maytech has recently been advertising their newer 6374 motors as battle hardened, so I decided to pick some up
General characteristics
Maytechs are classicly coggy, but have a real kick on startup. They’re also pretty loud but I like the noise

Can Weight: 311g
Stator weight: 553g
Approx Assembled weight: 870g
Stator length (Edge to edge, not including tallest winding): 40mm
Stator Diameter: 53mm

Internals
Magnet retention


Large bottom-sided retention ring, epoxy on the motors top to bottom, but only filling the gaps roughly halfway.

Hall Sensor PCB


The sensors sit just above the stator, but aren’t actually supported directly which is a shame. There is epoxy retaining the wires in the stator and at the bottom of the motor. There isn’t insulation, but the 5 pin connections are spread far apart. The 3 pin sensors however are much closer and aren’t epoxy coated for insulation

Shaft design
8mm through shaft with excellent retention via a small rounded key to prevent spinning in addition to accessible dual grub screws.

Can design
The can sits flush with the stator and has no air-gaps at the back, creating a more sealed design. It has a nipple on the back which can make it weird to dual mount on some trucks but the water and dust resistance is good. Its not possible to make a proper seal as when the motors spin things can always creep in.

Stator
40mm in length, actually suprisingly the same as the C6374s.


Dickyho C6374 / Ali motors / $40 Shitter motors


Cheap and cheerful, sometimes as low as $35 you can get this on ebay or aliexpress. They’re not actually 74mm in length, they’re a little shorter.
General characteristics
Smoother startup, and fairly quiet in FOC. Very “average”

Can Weight: 327g (10mm through shaft though)
Stator weight: 484g
Approx Assembled weight: 810g
Stator length (Edge to edge, not including tallest winding): 40mm
Stator Diameter: 53mm

Internals
Magnet retention
Shitty magnet glue only (Not pictured, all the ones I have are epoxied by myself)

Hall Sensor PCB


They’re below the stator. There isn’t any epoxy on the wires, there is also no temp sensor. Highly reccomend going sensorless with these, the phase cables are also very thin, which limits the motor to about 50 amps before they really get actually hot

Shaft design
10mm D shaped through shaft with only grub screws for retention with no recess to actually hold the shaft properly, although it is 10mm and epoxied to the can. Its impossible to find goddamn pulleys for this thing though, they only come in aluminum.

Can design
Its open on the back, so dust does get inside more easily. But in general its less of a problem than people make it out to be.

Stator
40mm in length, actually surprisingly the same as the Maytechs.


Full album of images including measurements

35 Likes

Great comparison. I have some of the Dickyho type motors, and you’re right about the sensors. Useless. But they’re decent enough performers.

7 Likes

Thank you for this information. This is great, and detailed.

6 Likes

I just want to know that the most durable motor is that ships in a reasonable time. Right now that seems to be the Janux and TB motors. The former is on back order. Am I missing an option?

1 Like

SK3/SK8. Also janux motors are just freerchobby motors iirc. Flipsky uses them too, they’re not greatly reliable in my experience. Its debated though, lots of people think 1 motor is best and others hate that motor

3 Likes

Where can I buy a battle hardened motor with a retainer ring then?

Edit: and epoxy on the sensors

You have to make it yourself. I think an SK3 is the best starting point for doing that.

In saying that, just cut sensors. they’re a liability and HFI is good enough that you don’t need them IMO

2 Likes

I need motors for my unity build, no HFI :frowning:

chuck the unity in the bin ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

jk, in that case my picks are TB, SK3 and maybe these new flipsky will beat maytechs but I don’t like coggy motors that much. Its all opinionated, but the top ones with thousands of miles backing their reliability are maytech, sk8/sk3 or torqueboards.

Also hoyt motors but they’re pretty expensive

1 Like

@torqueboards When will your 6380’s ship? Also are you still using that non-standard JST connector that requires an adapter?

Also

My maytechs on my AT build got a loose magnet the first month. I was furious because I spent a lot on them.

I want RacerStar to make 6374 motors. Those little red 5045s are so well put together.

5 Likes

my 6374 maytechs aren’t coggy at all. They’re smooth as butter.
Take a look

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Yea those are really good, loud but I think all small motors like that are. Maybe we could do a group buy and get them to make them?

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On ATs a lot of motors get smoothed out a lot because the startup amps are much higher and the motor is geared down way more. If you run maytechs on street wheels is much more noticable

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Dood. I would be all over that.

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I never tried it actually.

@Anubis great comparison. Could you do one about Racerstar 5065 if you manage to get one?

1 Like

In my experience, the Racerstar 5065, like almost every single other BLDC motor, eventually fails where the rotor interfaces the shaft, because it’s held only by tiny grub screws. They aren’t bad motors though, especially for the price.

Interested in hearing more about this, because I’ve had those motors fail in that same place and needed to add roll pins

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Relatively good i suppose. Anything can and will fail with enough use/abuse

Heres the keyway though

6 Likes

That is awesome :100:

4 Likes